Tree replacement strategy for Angliss Reserve

Consultation has concluded

Recognising their maturity and potential significance of the cypress trees at a local level Council commissioned both an arboricultural and heritage assessment report to inform planning for tree replacement. The arboricultural report found the majority of Monterey cypress growing around the boundaries of Angliss Reserve have reached their useful life expectancy and will continue to decline over ensuing years. It also confirms that the declining health of these trees presents moderate potential risk that cannot be sustained in the long term through contemporary arboricultural techniques.

The heritage report found that while there are no heritage listings or overlays associated with Angliss Reserve, the deliberate tree planting is estimated to have occurred around the mid 1930s and makes the site aesthetically significant at a local level.

Both reports recommend the trees be replaced in the same alignment with a species of similar shape and size to retain over the long term the character of Angliss Reserve.

To respect the distinct qualities of the Cypress trees, Council are planning to replace these trees with Cedrus libani, Lebanon Cedar shown in the graphic above.

This tree replacement strategy will occur in four stages to reduce the visual impact on the reserve and nearby residents the document to the right of the screen shows the proposed stages for removal and replanting.

Stage 1 tree removals will commence in front of the pavilion carpark (south-west corner of the site). These works are planned for early January 2017 to coincide with carpark improvement works.

Stage 2 tree removals will continue along the north-west frontage of Roberts Street and are programmed for early March 2017.

Replacement tree planting for stages 1 and 2 will commence after April 2017 when planting conditions are favourable.

Future stages are scheduled to occur after that date. Residents will receive further notification prior to each stage of the work.

Recognising their maturity and potential significance of the cypress trees at a local level Council commissioned both an arboricultural and heritage assessment report to inform planning for tree replacement. The arboricultural report found the majority of Monterey cypress growing around the boundaries of Angliss Reserve have reached their useful life expectancy and will continue to decline over ensuing years. It also confirms that the declining health of these trees presents moderate potential risk that cannot be sustained in the long term through contemporary arboricultural techniques.

The heritage report found that while there are no heritage listings or overlays associated with Angliss Reserve, the deliberate tree planting is estimated to have occurred around the mid 1930s and makes the site aesthetically significant at a local level.

Both reports recommend the trees be replaced in the same alignment with a species of similar shape and size to retain over the long term the character of Angliss Reserve.

To respect the distinct qualities of the Cypress trees, Council are planning to replace these trees with Cedrus libani, Lebanon Cedar shown in the graphic above.

This tree replacement strategy will occur in four stages to reduce the visual impact on the reserve and nearby residents the document to the right of the screen shows the proposed stages for removal and replanting.

Stage 1 tree removals will commence in front of the pavilion carpark (south-west corner of the site). These works are planned for early January 2017 to coincide with carpark improvement works.

Stage 2 tree removals will continue along the north-west frontage of Roberts Street and are programmed for early March 2017.

Replacement tree planting for stages 1 and 2 will commence after April 2017 when planting conditions are favourable.

Future stages are scheduled to occur after that date. Residents will receive further notification prior to each stage of the work.

You can leave feedback or ask questions on the proposed tree replacement here.

Bryson, I'll keep it short. Like comments below I would also much prefer native trees.

Tim over 2 years ago

Hi Bryson,What about Plane trees? They offer so much shade. The current trees and the suggested replacement are not suitable to sit underneath because they drop their pine needles and kill the grass under them. I love the idea of the picket fence as suggested by others, making it a true cricket ground.Thanks,Adam

Adam over 2 years ago

Hi Bryson, I am absolutely with Kylie and Jamie's comments including the suggestion to embrace native trees. I think the current style of tree is uninviting, both aesthetically and practically. I couldn't have been more pleased for the local area when I found out their replacement was being planned, until I found out the replacement tree was a similar style. Don't get me wrong, I can see their grandeur, but I think the space alone is grand! Another consideration I would like to put forth are trees which have the ability to provide shade and comfort for spectators. I don't feel the current style of tree provides due to the thin pine needles and the way in which the ground surrounding is left barren, and I fear the proposed replacement will be little different. I vision a park for the future where spectators of sport come to gather, and one which passers by can admire.Regards,Dani

Dani over 2 years ago

Hi Bryson,I must agree with Kylie's post. Nothing would look more beautiful. Look at Paine reserve Randwick in Sydney. This style would lift the park considerably.Jamie

Jakamar over 2 years ago

Dear Bryson,Regarding Angless reserve tree replacement, I would support using this time as an opportunity to make a change to plant native tree's. The argument being as a responsible modern city, we need to be looking for ways to repair our impact where possible, Maribyrnong has a great record in this aspect with Cruikshank park, McIvor Reserve and Stoney Creek all building beautiful Native landscapes. I respect the desire to retain a sense of grandeur around the reserve, however this could be achieved using some of the extraordinarily beautiful grand eucalyptus we have access too. Another way to create a sense of grandeur would be to introduce picket fencing around the field to assist creating a sense of casual vs formal use of the whole park area where people are more likely to keep their dogs off the playing field.It would look amazing with a stand of tightly packed Blue Gums planted behind! Thanks for taking the time to read my feedback and your efforts to retrieve feedback from the community, its very much appreciated. Change is always the harder choice.All the BestKylie

khutch over 2 years ago

Thank you for making such a fantastic choice. Really pleased with such a stately tree chosen from a climate which is most compatible to ours, which will preserve and enhance the character of Angliss Reserve. Very happy.

Brendan over 2 years ago